The Speak Up Blog

  • 21st Century Technology Leads to Better Hearing

    In the good old days, hearing aids weren’t very smart.  Hearing aids amplified sound the same, whether the sound was soft or loud, low-pitched or high-pitched, in front of you or behind you.  Technology was very inferior and it provided audiologists very little room for adjustments. Fortunately, today’s hearing aids are much smarter.  The 21st-century read more

  • What Every Hearing Aid User Should Know

      The process of wearing hearing aids can be complicated at times.  At Associates in Hearing, we like to make the process simple.  Here are some things that every hearing aid user should know: – Older hearing aids need repair more frequently, often due to ear wax getting inside the instrument. Most hearing aids now read more

  • The Successful Hearing Aid User

    Audiology researchers studied 160 hearing aid users to determine which factors contribute to successful hearing aid use.  Of the five factors identified, only one was related to hearing loss itself.  The other four factors were related to personality or attitude. The most important factors contributing to successful hearing aid use were: Family support: The most read more

  • Does Your Doctor Look for Hearing Loss?

    We get our eyes checked, we get our teeth checked but we don’t always give our ears the same level of care.  The invisible handicap of hearing loss is one that most people tend to put on the back burner.  One way can change this is by encouraging our primary care physicians to make this read more

  • Tips for Drivers with Hearing Loss

      The open road can be a dangerous place. Anyone getting into a car and turning on the ignition has a tremendous responsibility.  The life of the driver, passengers, pedestrians and other motorists are in many senses in a heightened state of vulnerability. Careful driving requires the engagement of visual and auditory senses to make read more

  • What to Expect at Your First Hearing Appointment

    Your appointment will last anywhere between 1 to 1 ½ hours.  Your provider will review your history, lifestyle, perform an otoscopic inspection of your ears, and then test your hearing in a sound booth.  If the evaluation reveals that you have hearing loss, the provider will need to determine whether or not you would benefit read more